Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 19, 2017 6:00am-8:30am GMT

6:00 am
hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. british holidaymakers begin arriving back from the gambia, amid growing concerns of political unrest in the west african state it was very scary and the local people were crying and worried about their children and they have no work. thousands more tourists are still waiting to be flown home as a deadline for a political agreement passes. good morning, it's thursday 19th january. also this morning: theresa may heads to switzerland to explain her brexit plan to world business leaders, as she's warned that leaving the eu could mean more economic pain. we heard from big business but how
6:01 am
about small firms that import and export from europe? what would leaving the single market mean that for them? the race to find vaccines for three deadly diseases which experts fear could spark a global health emergency. in sport, johanna konta has reached the third round of the australian open and liverpool are through to the fourth round of the fa cup, but they needed lucas leiva's first goal in seven years to make it past plymouth. these students are off to washington to perform for donald trump at his inauguration. we will have more from johnin inauguration. we will have more from john in to blow in about 20 minutes time. and carol has the weather. good morning. the weather today is similarto good morning. the weather today is similar to the last few days and it will be like that for the next few. cloud across many areas with a
6:02 am
frosty start for the south. 0ther parts of the uk today will see brea ks parts of the uk today will see breaks in the cloud and i will tell you where in 15 minutes. first, our main story. hundreds of british holidaymakers have landed back in the uk from the gambia over concerns of a worsening political crisis. the foreign office is continuing to advise people to avoid all but essential travel to the country, after its outgoing president refused to meet a midnight deadline to handover power. greg dawson reports. back home sooner than they thought but relieved to be safe. these passengers landed at manchester in the early hours and thousands more will fly home today after their holidays ended with the threat of violent conflict. it was very scary and the local people were crying and worried about their children. my family is still there. my daughter with her baby, my first daughter.
6:03 am
they are not the ones who have left. 0ver they are not the ones who have left. over 25,000 citizens have fled to neighbouring synagogue as the threat ofa neighbouring synagogue as the threat of a military invasion looms. this crisis centres on one man refusing to buckle to pressure from original alliance now surrounding his tiny nation. yahya jammeh initially conceded defeat in last month's election after 22 years in power but he changed his mind claiming the vote had been fraudulent. the man who defeated him, adama barrow, fled to senegal but remains confident he will sworn in later today. troops from senegal and ghana are now gathered along the border and nigeria has sent fighter jets gathered along the border and nigeria has sent fighterjets and a warship to the area. they have asked for un permission to intervene in after their deadline for the president to step down has expired. while hope exists a peaceful solution, thousands of tourists have
6:04 am
an anxious wait to leave the country. theresa may will outline her brexit strategy to business and political leaders at the world economic forum in the swiss resort of davos today. the prime minister will seek to convince her audience, many of whom opposed britain leaving the eu, that it is possible to make a political and economic success of brexit. it comes just days after mrs may confirmed her plan does include britain leaving the european single market. our business correspondent, tanya beckett is in davos for us this morning. so, tanya, the first time the prime minister will be facing business leaders since the plan for brexit was announced on tuesday. what sort of reception do you think she will get? i think they welcome the clarity that she gave. that is the response i have been hearing. she will want to rapidly talk to bankers as the wall street and he just be see say they need to set up some sort of solid operation is in what is going to remain of the european union. she will need to talk to them
6:05 am
rapidly. 0therwise union. she will need to talk to them rapidly. otherwise it is going to be very difficult for her to expand exactly very difficult for her to expand exa ctly o n very difficult for her to expand exactly on what she said earlier in the week in terms of what britain wa nts to the week in terms of what britain wants to leave. she is going to say to business leaders here we are open for business in britain. that is, after all, a pitch to other businesses. an investment pitch. she will want to put her best foot forward and what she said which is that britain is turning outwards, not inwards and the fact that it is leaving the european union does not mean that britain, that the united kingdom is not in fact not in the mood to trade. however, on the other side of the negotiation we have the europeans here who are still digging their heels in. let's hearfrom the former finance minister of france that he is now the european commission up for economic and financial affairs. it must be clear that you can not have all of the advantages of being a member of the
6:06 am
clu b advantages of being a member of the club when you are out of the club. i think our british friends, who invented clubs, can understand that. if you are here, you are in, if you we re if you are here, you are in, if you were out, you are out. there is no free access, it is not a free lunch. i think it is worth reminding ourselves that there is a broader picture here. britain is not the only country that is looking to sever trade ties with partners. remember the united states is discussing mexico and other countries as well saying that globalisation has not been an unmitigated success so companies are now asking what can we do, because automation is also part ofjob loss, not just offshore automation is also part ofjob loss, notjust offshore or in, what can we do to reassure workers that they have a future? scientists say they're working to deal with three diseases which they fear could cause global health emergencies. a group of charities and governments have committed more than 370 million to developing vaccines for
6:07 am
middle east respiratory syndrome, lassa fever and nipah virus, as our global health correspondent tulip mazumdar reports. these majestic creatures are believed to be brooding middle east and respiratory symptom. the virus was first identified here in saudi arabia in 2012, around one third of those infected die. this lap in 0xford those infected die. this lap in oxford is developing a vaccine to protect people. it is one of the most advanced versions out there. if this vaccine works it could still ta ke this vaccine works it could still take a decade or so to get it to those who need it. historically, money for these of skua viruses has not been forthcoming in the regulatory process is long and complex. scientists are also developing vaccines for net virus, which kills people in bangladesh and
6:08 am
lassa fever which already claims at 5000 lives in west africa every year. the research charity the welcome trust as part of this new coalition which aims to develop and test vaccines for these three viruses in the next five years for a we have been lucky so far but the world has major gaps for infections we know about which could cause a bowler like events and then spread around the world quickly. that puts the world in a very vulnerable place. there is no way to know which virus will strike next but it is hoped that putting time and money into developing new vaccines now could stop the next small outbreak becoming the next global health emergency. and after seven we'll be speaking to a professor of infectious diseases and global health about the research. that's at ten past seven. tomorrow donald trump will become the 45th president of the united
6:09 am
states, ten weeks after winning the election. yesterday he tweeted a photo of himself riding his inaugural address as saying that he was looking forward to friday. meanwhile barack 0bama gave his last press c0 nfe re nce meanwhile barack 0bama gave his last press conference as head of state and offered his successor advice on the presidency. i can tell you, and this is something i have told him, that this is a job of such magnitude that this is a job of such magnitude that you can not do it by yourself. you are enormously reliant on a team. the former us president, george bush senior, has been moved to intensive care in the hospital in texas where he has been receiving treatment for pneumonia since saturday. mr bush, who is 92, is said to be stable after undergoing a procedure under sedation to ease his breathing. his wife, barbara, who is 91, has been admitted to the same hospital in dallas as a precaution, suffering from fatigue and a cough. the government's being urged to make sure all victims of crime in england
6:10 am
and wales can make statements about how it's affected them. the ministry ofjustice says it will announce plans "in due course" to strengthen victims‘ rights. the victims commissioner says only a small number of people are currently being given the opportunity. we need now to have victims rights and an establishment that gives them the quality, respect and actually the quality, respect and actually the protection that they should quite rightly have because they have lost a loved one. this review shows that enough is enough and i am working with government to ensure that the victims have the rates they truly deserve to give them respect and dignity and the protection that they should have to ensure that they feel that voices being listened to. 60% of primates are now threatened with extinction because of human activities, according to new research published in the journal, science advances. an international assessment, led by british scientists, has found if urgent action isn't ta ken, our closest biological
6:11 am
relatives face an extinction crisis. victoria gill has more. 0ur closest biological relatives. but while the human population continues to grow, most of our fellow primates are now sliding towards extinction. this international team of scientists trawled through the data on more than 500 primate species, revealing a looming extinction crisis. they estimate that 60% of primate species are now threatened with extinction, and 75% have populations that are in decline. these guys are ring—tailed lemurs, and they are just one of the primate species that's been assessed in this new global study. as nice as it is to see them thriving here in captivity, their natural habitat is disappearing fast. and its human activity that's driving that. forest habitat that these animals rely on is being destroyed, primarily for agriculture and logging. the forest provides essential
6:12 am
services for people. they help in mitigating climate change by being carbon stocks. they help in providing clear water for people. people. pollinations so people can grow their crops. reversing these declines means looking closely at where we source products like timber, palm oil and meat, making sure destruction of tropical forests is not part of their production process. an air quality alert‘s been issued in london for today, by the city's mayor. air pollution is expected to be poor across areas of the capital. people who have heart or lung problems, or the elderly, are being advised to reduce strenuous activity particularly outdoors. in the first five days of 2017, london breached its legal limits for toxic air for the entire year. when a dog takes on a tiger you
6:13 am
would think there is only one winner. in the case of this wild duck it faced down a male sumatran tiger in australia... the duck flew into the enclosure, the tiger gave chase but everytime the tiger closed on it... the duck gets away! the park staff said the duck versus tiger game lasted about ten minutes. that is one brave dark. tiger game lasted about ten minutes. that is one brave darklj tiger game lasted about ten minutes. that is one brave dark. i would be out of there like a shot. of all places that a dog would choose to swim, you would choose this spot. there you go. the duck is safe as well. i think the tiger is having an off day, a slow day. good morning. johanna konta has won at the australian open. there is a woman who has really worked on her game in
6:14 am
the last year and she has worked on not just her the last year and she has worked on notjust her game the last year and she has worked on not just her game but the last year and she has worked on notjust her game but also her attitude to matches. she does not get stressed, she has learned to let go of anxiety when she is losing a set. she has worked really hard and it is great to see that. heather watson and kyle edmund are both out now. novak djokovic is on court at the moment. he fought back after losing the first set to be unseeded denis istomin. it is currently one set each and novak djokovic is one break up in the third. liverpool could only score one all. the site scored in the first half to ensure that they will be in the next round. there have been many tributes this morning to rachel, the former england women's captain. she was
6:15 am
also vice president of the wolverhampton wanderers captained england between 1966 and 1978. she also played in the first ever women's match at lord's. we will be talking about her plenty this morning. shall we have a look at the papers? i wondered... what position does he play? he has done really well. lucas was obviously delighted. lots of fancy testing that liverpool perhaps could have scored more against plymouth argyle.
6:16 am
still a win. let's have a look at the front pages. significant on the front page of the sun. theresa may writing in the sun newspaper. 0bviously on the subject of brexit. some of the quotes from what she has said, specifically she is talking about a message to ordinary working people. we will make this a brexit that works for ordinary working people, is the phrase, by ensuring that every worker enjoys the rights and protections they deserve. a story on britain's trade deals. britain has already begun informal trade negotiations with several countries across the world, as liam fox revealed today. he says brexit is the key to britain's future and prosperity. and cricket mourns the pioneer
6:17 am
rachel flynt. away from brexit, bin collections. the nightmare of monthly in collections. people saying they had to burn rubbish or beg neighbours to ta ke to burn rubbish or beg neighbours to take in their waste. it is a massive achievement getting your right —— your bin is right. we had a long conversation yesterday about bins. 0ne we had a long conversation yesterday about bins. one of the problems of modern life. it was an achievement when i got the right bin out. we did mention that rachael heyhoe flint is all over the papers. so many achievements to talk about. she was a groundbreaker, she was iconic. she played in the first ever women's world cup. in fact, this year england's women will play the world cup and they pretty much everything to this woman. she died yesterday at
6:18 am
the age of 77. she spent the late yea rs of the age of 77. she spent the late years of her life nursing her husband, but she was also goalkeeper for the england women's hockey team. she broke the malt in the 70s. in the 60s and 70s. she was highly unusual and one of life's enthusiasts. thank you, sally. really quickly, i want to show you one thing. you will like this. dan eva ns. one thing. you will like this. dan evans. hasn't got a sponsor, had to go and buy a shirt in australia when he got there. $19 each and he bought eight of them. we will talk more about that later. let's find out what's happening with the weather forecast. how is it looking? this morning it is looking fairly cloudy. what we had yesterday is what we will have today, with a couple of exceptions. another cloudy
6:19 am
day, with some mist around. most of that will lift quickly, as will any patchy fog. to give you an idea of the temperatures, the military yesterday. where we have the clear skies in the south and south—east it's a cold start. come further north and it isn't as cold. here we have the weather front and as we push into scotland and northern ireland, temperatures are a bit higher. as we go through the day what you will find is that we will hang on to high pressure. high pressure has been dominating our pressure has been dominating our pressure for the last while and it will continue to do so. the weather we have at the moment won't change dramatically until sometime next week. this morning in southern counties we have clear skies at a cold start. expect to be scraping your car. also some shallow mist and fog, which will lift clear the lack quickly —— lift quickly. heading up into northern england and scotland and we've got more cloud. the weak weather front will produce rain and
6:20 am
drizzle, but very patchy. we have showery outbreaks across the north—west scotland. northern island off toa north—west scotland. northern island off to a cloudy start, but not especially cold. moving back across wales with the top end of the weather front with more cloud. in the south, war breaks. the weather front extends from norfolk, across the midlands, into wales. but in lincolnshire and southern parts of northern england, where we are prone to see some spits and spots through the day. today there's a better chance of more brighter breaks. we could see some in the shelter at the welsh hills. the same across northern ireland, north—east england and ireland, sunshine across north—east scotland. temperatures coming down little bit compared to what they have been in the north, where we've been so used to double figures. the same for northern ireland. into this evening and overnight, more of the same. where
6:21 am
we have clear skies again we will have widespread frost, maybe patchy mist and fog. temperatures tumbling early. under the cloud we have temperatures values are little bit higher. north—east scotland is sticking out because here we have clear skies. that means first thing tomorrow where we have the clear skies, with any mist and fog, it will brighten up and we have sunshine. not a will brighten up and we have sunshine. nota bad will brighten up and we have sunshine. not a bad day tomorrow. dry for most of us, and with the thick cloud we could have a couple of spots of rain. but at this stage in mid—january it is pretty healthy. temperatures down a touch, but still we are looking at between 6—8 celsius. you would still need to wrap up warm, but you would expect that in january! we certainly would. thank you. with just one day left until donald trump is sworn in, reparations are in full swing. but can he deliver
6:22 am
theirjobs and trade that he promised? this week we have been taking a road trip through the heart of america on route a5. today, breakfast'sjon kay is in tupelo, mississippi, the birthplace of elvis presley, to hear their hopes for the next four years. 0ne one last practice before heading to washington. tonight, the tupelo high school band will be travelling 900 mild from mississippi to the capital. the play at president trump's inauguration. your face is going to ache. you think so? what are you most excited about? dustin martin parade and the washington for the first time. what do you think of
6:23 am
your new president? donald trump got 60% of the votes in this state. the stu d e nts 60% of the votes in this state. the students might be playing for him, but that doesn't mean they are all fa ns but that doesn't mean they are all fans of the new man in the white house. if you have been able to vote, put your hands up if you would have voted for donald trump. not exactly overwhelming. three.|j have voted for donald trump. not exactly overwhelming. three. i think some of his ideas are pretty great andi some of his ideas are pretty great and i think you can make america great again, wejust and i think you can make america great again, we just have to believe in him and see what happens. you didn't put your hand up. why not?” don't like him. you are about to go and play for him. i know, but i am forced to. i like washington, what i don't like him. you are going for the trip? yeah, basically. lots of celebrities said no to performing at the inauguration. why did you say yes? are not a fan of trump but i am
6:24 am
going for the experience and for my band. i'm not going for him, i am going for me. music matters in this small southern town. in fact, it put tupelo on the map. just off route 45 is the tiny house where elvis presley was born. but we're not here to talk about the king, we are here to talk about the king, we are here to talk about the king, we are here to talk about the new president. because as well as producing rock tn! because as well as producing rock ‘n' roll stars, a crew to produce as ca rs. ‘n' roll stars, a crew to produce as cars. look at this. 1957 chevrolet. i wish we had hired one of these for a retreat. donald trump has promised a retreat. donald trump has promised a return to the heyday of american manufacturing. he says he will create jobs and improve trade deals. this local steel company supplies the car industry. they believe the new president will cut red tape, cut taxes and boost growth. new president will cut red tape, cut taxes and boost growthlj new president will cut red tape, cut taxes and boost growth. i feel very optimistic. the boss here hopes
6:25 am
donald trump will fill his government with tough business people. and if they don't do it he will fire them! but it isn't the apprentice. politics is more complicated and more nuanced. will he be able to cope with the political diplomatic challenges? that remains to be seen. i think he is introducing something into the political landscape that has never been done before. politics all shook up. elvis stood right here on the cross and asked for his first guitar. this hardware store is where the young elvis presley's music career began. as well as guitars they sell tools to local businesses and they are waiting to see what trump really means forjobs and manufacturing. we know what he will do. this is a man who has not got a political record. he has gone on record sometimes supporting things, but not as a sitting officeholder. does it worry you that he hasn't given much detail about what he will do? he has made big promises but not
6:26 am
explained hywel. it does worry us andi explained hywel. it does worry us and i think it worries everybody, what the future holds. anything you ta ke what the future holds. anything you take to the parade is subject to being searched. the students are to go. tomorrow they will perform outside the white house. and this nation will have to march to a very different beat. and tomorrow, on the final part of his journey down route 45, jon kay will report from washington county in alabama, where he'll be speaking to people who feel left out of politics. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: two of the largest investment banks in the city of london have confirmed some staff will move abroad when the uk leaves the eu. but how are smaller british businesses planning for the changes that are starting to emerge? ben is at a rug factory for us this morning. good morning. welcome to manchester.
6:27 am
and this rug retailer. we've heard from big is less about what leaving the single market and the customs union could mean for them, but what about places like this? they import about places like this? they import a lot of their rugs from europe but also places like india. so leaving the single market could make it more expensive for them to import things here. this sort of stuff is also more expensive. it costs more to import because of the fall in the value of the pound. we will talk this morning about what impact that could mean for small businesses, what they will do to respond and how they can react to what they've heard from theresa may this week. so we will talk more about that in a little while. before that, it's get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. there are calls for the capital's congestion charge to be reformed, so that drivers would pay more at rush hour. the london assembly says trafficjams are so serious
6:28 am
that drivers who spend the longest time in the most heavily congested areas should be charged more. the mayor's office says there are already moves to tackle the problem, including better coordination of roadworks. british airways cabin crew at heathrow go on strike today in a dispute over pay. the workers, who are members of unite, are walking out for three days. ba says all its long—haul flights will operate as normal. but the airline has had to cancel a small number of short—haul services. the london sprinterjames ellington said he doesn't know how he or his teammate survived a motorbike accident in spain. the athlete has had surgery on a broken leg and both men have a suspected broken pelvis. there are fears that they may not be able to compete at the highest level again. a special service will take place this afternoon to remember those who lost their lives in the silvertown explosion, which happened 100 years ago today.
6:29 am
hundreds more were injured at the blast in a docklands and emissions factory. the explosion remains the loudest ever in the capital, and was so forceful it shattered windows as far away as the savoy hotel. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, we've got no bakerloo line between harrow and wealdstone and queen's park, after a signalfailure. the overground the overg round has the overground has minor delays. there are also minor delays on the victoria line between king's cross and brixton. there are also no heathrow connect trains this morning because of signalling problems. this is how it looks at the blackwall tunnel. northbound traffic on the southern approach is slow from blackwall lane. and there's been an accident in hounslow. the a4 bath road is partly blocked westbound at henlys roundabout. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. today's weather is looking similar to yesterday. still feeling cold, but with lots of sparkling sunshine. we start the day
6:30 am
again at about the freezing mark in central london, but in rural spots down to —4, minus five. don't forget to wear layers this morning and save a bit of time for your car windscreen. lots of sunshine around today. winds are very light and temperatures struggle only between five and seven degrees celsius by the time we get to the end of the afternoon. 0vernight, no big changes. we get the blue tinge on the map again, indicating sub zero temperatures. that's a few early mist patches around. 0r temperatures. that's a few early mist patches around. or the most pa rt mist patches around. or the most part a nice, mist patches around. or the most parta nice, bright mist patches around. or the most part a nice, bright sunny start. high pressure dominating, notjust on friday but for the course of the weekend, so we should stay dry. there could be a little more cloud tomorrow edging into northern home counties, but again plenty of sunshine, especially for the south. and another freezing start on saturday. more in a way of cloud. but on sunday the brightness should emerge again and no rain in the forecast either for the start of
6:31 am
next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to charlie and steph. bye for now. also this morning, we're talking about the cost of food, after it emerged the price of wholesale vegetables is double what it was last year. we'll find out why. and, if you're missing planet earth two, there's a new series showing wildlife from a different perspective. we'll meet the producers behind spy in the wild later in the programme. hundreds of british holidaymakers have landed back in the uk from the gambia amid concerns of a worsening political crisis.
6:32 am
the foreign office is continuing to advise people to avoid all but essential travel to the country, after its outgoing president refused to meet a midnight deadline to hand over power. thousands more tourists are due to be brought home in the coming days. greg dawson reports. back home sooner than they thought but relieved to be safe. these passengers landed at manchester in the early hours and thousands more will fly home today after their holidays ended with the threat of violent conflict. it was very scary and the local people were crying and worried about their children. my family is still there. my daughter with her baby, my first daughter. they are not the only ones who have left. over 25,000 citizens have fled to neighbouring senegal as the threat of a military invasion looms. this crisis centres on one man refusing to buckle to pressure
6:33 am
from a regional alliance now surrounding his tiny nation. yahya jammeh initially conceded defeat in last month's election after 22 years in power but he changed his mind, claiming the vote had been fraudulent. the man who defeated him, adama barrow, fled to senegal but remains confident he will sworn in later today. troops from senegal and ghana are now gathered along the border and nigeria has sent fighterjets and a warship to the area. they have asked for un permission to intervene, after their deadline for the president to step down expired. while hope exists for a peaceful solution, thousands of tourists have an anxious wait to leave the country. theresa may will outline her brexit plan to business and political leaders at the world economic forum in davos today. the prime minister will seek to convince her audience, many of whom opposed britain leaving the eu,
6:34 am
that it is possible to make a political and economic success of brexit. it comes just days after mrs may confirmed her plan does include britain leaving the european single market. scientists say they're working to deal with three diseases they fear could become global health emergencies. a group of charities and governments s spending more than £370 million to tackle middle east respiratory syndrome, and the lassa and nipah viruses. the former us president, george bush senior, has been moved to intensive care in the hospital in texas where he has been receiving treatment for pneumonia since saturday. mr bush, who is 92, is said to be stable after undergoing a procedure to ease his breathing. his wife, barbara, who is 91, has been admitted to the same hospital in dallas as a precaution, suffering from fatigue and a cough. the world's primates face an "extinction crisis" with 60% of species now threatened with extinction, according
6:35 am
to research published in the journal ‘science advances‘. an international study, led by british scientists, has found if urgent action isn‘t ta ken, our closest biological relatives face an extinction crisis. today is barack 0bama‘s final day in office as donald trump prepares to be sworn in as the 45th us president. yesterday, the first lady michelle 0bama, was captured doing a final lap of the white house, as pictures emerged of the family‘s new home. in his last press conference as head of state, mr 0bama said he looked forward to spending more time with his wife and his "precious girls". if you‘re parents don‘t read about you, you have problems. but my daughters and i are something. they
6:36 am
just... they surprised and in chant and impress me more and more every single day as they grow up. and impress me more and more every single day as they grow uplj and impress me more and more every single day as they grow up. i was trying to work out whether was a lap around the white house or a lap as in making sure that they have everything. probably a bit of both. big day tomorrow. there is a change in sport as well. a wind of change ina in sport as well. a wind of change in a way. i am trying to make a segway. —— trying to make a link. britain‘sjohanna konta eased through to the third round of the australian open. konta — who‘s the ninth seed — beat 19—year—old naomi 0sa ka ofjapan in straights sets. she‘ll play former world number one caroline wozniacki on saturday. ra rely
6:37 am
rarely do we get an easy round so it isa rarely do we get an easy round so it is a given but i am looking forward to the challenge and to trying and to the challenge and to trying and to being out on court competing and ultimately i am trying to make my stay here in melbourne as long as possible. not such good news for heather watson though. she had five match points but eventually lost in three sets to the american qualifier jennifer brady. and kyle edmund is also out. he lost in straight sets to spain‘s pablo carreno busta. the positive is that it is another experience. but, you know, i have to be realistic at the same time and i‘m disappointed with myself so, yeah. iaim i‘m disappointed with myself so, yeah. i aim to do better all the time. number two seed novak djokovic is on court at the moment and has fought back after losing the first set to the unseeded denis istomin, it‘s currently one set all. we will keep you up—to—date with
6:38 am
what is happening throughout the morning here on the programme. liverpool secured their place in the fourth round of the fa cup, butjust one goal settled it in their replay at plymouth argyle. after a goalless draw at anfield, 11 days ago captain for the night lucas leiva scored his first goal in seven years to break the deadlock at home park. the visitors missed a penalty but it was the league two side who came closest to equalising when jake jervis hit the post. liverpool face wolves in the next round. two, three, four nil that would have been 0k. two, three, four nil that would have been ok. so one, i‘m fine. i said before the game that we do not want extra time, we want to go into the next round. we want to leave here as early as possible, despite it being quite nicely, we want to leave as early as possible. we have done exceptionally well over liverpool in the last two games and we had a
6:39 am
numberof the last two games and we had a number of good opportunities in the first half and even in the second half we hit the post as well. i think the players are proud of their performance as two other supporters. premier league southampton looked to be heading for extra time against championship side norwich at st mary‘s. it was goalless after 90 minutes but shane long got the final touch after a goalmouth scramble in injury time. saints will play arsenal at home in the fourth round. newcastle are also through to the fourth round after beating fellow championship side birmingham 3—1 at st james‘ park they face league one 0xford next in the fa cup. rachael heyhoe flint, the former england women‘s cricket captain, has died at the age of 77. baroness heyhoe flint, who was also vice—president of wolverhampton wanderers, captained england between 1966 and 1978. she also played in the first ever women‘s match at lord‘s, against australia, in 1976. she has driven a great change and been an amazing inspiration in our sport and probably beyond our sport,
6:40 am
actually. i think she will go down as, armour, someone who has progressed and driven change for women in sport more broadly than just cricket. clare connor speaking yesterday about rachel heyhoe flint. and before i go, let‘s bring you up—to—date with a round the world yacht race due to finish today. alex thomson, a british sailor, is in second place. he is up against a man who is significantly ahead of him. who knows what may happen over the coming hours. it depends what you are looking at. i would say they are due to finish this afternoon and when they left, when they originally left in november, 300,000 people lined up to watch them leave. they are expecting a similar number to bring them home this afternoon. are expecting a similar number to bring them home this afternoonm terms of sailing he has brought down the leader dramatically. insanely. evenif
6:41 am
the leader dramatically. insanely. even if it comes second, when he comes second, he will break the record for the race. but it still looks very much like it will be second. it is an extraordinary achievementjust to do this. he has beenin achievementjust to do this. he has been in communication with the navy urbanite. he said he was exhausted. unsurprisingly. thank you. we will see you later. the cost of imported vegeta bles see you later. the cost of imported vegetables such as zucchini lettuce and broccoli could be about to rise in price because of bad weather in europe. supermarkets have also told the bbc that concerns over supply of fresh food. dan johnson the bbc that concerns over supply of fresh food. danjohnson is a new covent garden market for us. what is the story come down? good morning. there is definitely a shortage on certain kinds of vegetable. i have got one of the only crates of cou rg ettes got one of the only crates of courgettes in this place. 0ne got one of the only crates of courgettes in this place. one year ago this would have cost about six or e7 ago this would have cost about six or £7 for the plate. today this is
6:42 am
going for up to £24 because there has been such a shortage, because of the weather conditions in spain and italy and the fact that there has been heavy rain before christmas and then flooding, a cold snap, even snow on the ground. that stops to produce getting overheated britain and drives up the price and means that some people who would normally be customers here at the whole sale market during the evening have been going to supermarkets and clearing the shelves they are. that is what some of the traders you think has been happening. that has contributed to the shortage in the fact that people cannot get a hold of things like courgettes and broccoli. this place is winding down now. it is active through the night, especially in the early hours, but during the evening i have been speaking to traders about the problems they face. we normally order at a lorry with ten or 12 pallets on. they are sending for all five pallets. some
6:43 am
of the green stuff has really been affected. things that we want to bring in ourtoo affected. things that we want to bring in our too expensive. —— are too expensive. i have been in this trade for 40 years and it has never been as bad as these where everything is so expensive. many of our customers have been going to supermarkets and clearing them out and other supermarkets have nothing. potatoes and carrots are always good but foreign produce is like gold. it is as easy to buy a pallet of gold bars as it is to buy anything else. there are some traders here who cannot get courgettes at all. toby is one of them. we have none at all. it has been very difficult this
6:44 am
winter. the price goes up by pounds every day. so you have disappointed customers? very. we promised supply and we cannot. any alternatives or other places you could get the vegetable from ? other places you could get the vegetable from? we we attempt to purchase direct from the continent that there is nothing out there. we think the conditions will carry on because it is notjust the crop that is damaged now. to replace it, they cannot get on the ground because it is wet. they can plant new plants to get supply going forward. so you are looking for the english season to start in the spring. you will need an alternative vegetable instead. get hold of some parsnip potato. thank you very much. broccoli as well is affected. let‘s
6:45 am
have a look at the weather forecast. how is it looking here? it is fairly quiet. good morning. the weather you had yesterday will be very similar to the weather we have today and tomorrow. we don‘t see a break down in the weather until tuesday or wednesday next week when it becomes more unsettled from the west. today againafairly more unsettled from the west. today again a fairly cloudy start for many. there is some mist around and patches of fork. but some of us starting on a frosty note and a sunny one. these are the kind of temperatures, if you are stepping out now. —6 in parts. cardiff and manchester are little bit higher. interestingly at the moment in aberdeenshire it is minus two. but if you go to the highlands it is plus ten. so a huge array of temperatures going on. why we‘ve got this is we have high pressure
6:46 am
dominating the forecast. and we have called their being pulled in by weak fronts. as we go through this morning in southern counties of england, and the south—west and south—east that‘s a bit of cloud and fair but also a lot clear skies. shallow mist and fog will lift readily and also some frost. through the midlands and in the norfolk, into northern england, a lot of cloud, and spits and spots of rain. clear skies across the north—east means a cold start. showers in the north—west, but generally cloudy in scotla nd north—west, but generally cloudy in scotland and the same for northern ireland. you also have a cloudy start, but relatively mild. then as we move back across wales the weather front affecting the north at the moment, producing some of that cloud. through the day you can see where we are looking at the sunshine, but today we have a better chance of seeing some rakes in the
6:47 am
cloud, particularly through the sheltered hills. we should see some to the shelter of the hills in northern ireland, north—east england and we will hang on to the showers across scotland. temperature wise, coming down in northern ireland and parts of scotland where we have had double figures, still only ten in stornoway. temperatures roughly between five and eight celsius. so another day of wrapping up warmly, but we would expect that at this time in january. but we would expect that at this time injanuary. into the evening and overnight we have more clear skies, so looking at frost again and mist and fog. breaks in the north of scotland, so—called here. but where we have the cloud temperatures are hanging on and you can see the difference. temperatures will fall away quickly in evening. tomorrow we start off, any shallow mist and fog lifting, then some sunshine. that extends through wales. northern
6:48 am
parts of scotland also seen that. we‘ve had a lot of sunshine in the north—east. parts of the north—west will also have sunshine, but we still have this cloud and some of that will produce the shower. by tomorrow the temperatures coming down. we‘ve lost the double figures and we have between 6—8 celsius. thanks for a much. see you later. two big banks have said they are moving jobs out of london, just two days after the prime minister announced her plans to leave the eu. but how are similar, smaller british businesses planning for the changes that are starting to emerge? ben is with some business owners in greater manchester this morning. good morning. welcome to manchester. we are here because we are looking at the impact of what we heard from theresa may, as far as the customs union and single market is concerned. what difference it would make for small businesses. we have heard from big firms, but what about
6:49 am
small businesses, many have small resources . small businesses, many have small resources. i‘ve got the bosses of three firms with me for we‘ve got daniel, the boss at the rug firm that we are right, victoria runs a pr firm and roger runs a cyber security business. good morning. starting with you, daniel, talk us through the impact this could have as far as the customs union and the single market is concerned, because you import a lot of the rugs we see from europe? we do. from europe and india. at the moment the impact is yet to be seen, how that will affect us. i feel we yet to be seen, how that will affect us. ifeel we are yet to be seen, how that will affect us. i feel we are entering a period of uncertainty. we will thrive to face up to the challenge and take the business with whatever it brings. it is funny, victoria. we tend to look at big firms. they have the resources to move staff around and make these decisions. smaller
6:50 am
firms don‘t have those resources by the smaller firms have that agility. the biggest challenge we've had re ce ntly the biggest challenge we've had recently is the recession and five years ago it was so unpredictable in this country. it was probably this time five years ago i started thinking about going somewhere else, got on a plane in the middle of the jury got on a plane in the middle of the jury to dubai and that decision process was quick with my team. —— little of july. and process was quick with my team. —— little ofjuly. and we used social media to get new business in dubai and we had money in the bank by the end ofjune. sol and we had money in the bank by the end ofjune. so i think you can as a business take opportunities and that's what we've got to do now, think about digital, you can go across the world using social media, there are lots of opportunities still. and, roger, manufacturing firms and retailers, we looked at them, but what about services? what will it mean? we have people around the globe, in the us, europe and the
6:51 am
uk, so for us most of our delivery is done at source, so we are already in the markets we are operating in. so we don't feel too concerned about restrictions in terms of importing and exporting. but one area where we re and exporting. but one area where were initially concerned about is in the uk we employ a significant amount of uk nationals. that's not about lowering wages, it is keeping our level of technical competence— is the we were reassured by the announcement that skilled workers aren't going to be affected. so we aren't going to be affected. so we aren't too concerned with the way we trade. daniel, briefly, prices, one of the immediate impacts will be the fall in the pound which will make things more expensive to import. you‘ve been able to hold off raising prices? we've worked hard, negotiating with suppliers to ensure the impact will be minimised to our customers, it is important for us. but the question is how will can we
6:52 am
continue to do that and which way will the currencies change in the future? good to talk to you all. thanks for now. we will talk later. really the impact is the uncertainty and trying to come up with a plan to deal with things. we don‘t really know yet what happened. we‘ve had a bit more clarity from the reason they as far as the customs union and single market is concerned, but for small businesses it will be about working out what happens next and how they can prepare for that. more from me after 7pm. you have a tray of pastries as well, that‘s good to see! 0n touched! yet. the lancaster bomber became one of the most famous and effective aircraft to take part in world war two. it played a crucial role in securing victory for the allies, but only two of them are still able to fly. 0ne family is hoping that will change, thanks to a remarkable 30 year restoration project, which they hope will see another lancaster return to the sky.
6:53 am
breakfast‘s tim muffett reports. hallo, skipper. wartime recordings ofa hallo, skipper. wartime recordings of a lancaster aircrew. britain‘s most famous 4—mar. although this one has not flown for 40 years. —— most famous bomber. the site and the sound... there isn‘t another sound like it. just over 7000, 300 lancaster bombers were built. almost half were lost in combat during world war two. but for harold and his family, the desire to fully restore on is personal. his brother, christopher, a member of bomber
6:54 am
command died in a mission over germany in 1944. harold and his other brother, fred, wanted to restore a n other brother, fred, wanted to restore an aircraft to honour those who never came back. in 1983 their search finally ended. we knew that it was either now or never, because we would never get another chance to buy a lancaster. fred died four yea rs buy a lancaster. fred died four years ago before the family dream of seeing this lancaster back in the sky could be fulfilled. fred‘s grandson andrew is determined to make it happen. lancaster parts are very ha rd to make it happen. lancaster parts are very hard to come by, so you snap up parts when they become available. there are few companies that buy up old stock after the war. then people just bought random parts and have had it in their garage for 30— 40 yea rs. had it in their garage for 30— 40 years. such a tight squeeze! it is very tight inside. added to by the fa ct very tight inside. added to by the fact that there‘s a lot of equipment and the main spies come through. this is the main back on the aircraft? yes, these spas, that the backbone, where the main strength
6:55 am
is. it is important we checked to make sure they are good. they‘ve got an x—ray later this month. make sure they are good. they‘ve got an x-ray later this month. this is the cop it. it will be such a moment if you do get this back in the air. —— cockpit. if you do get this back in the air. -- cockpit. we will be flying minimum crew, if we managed to get her airworthy. it will be quite a thing to be onboard. members of raf bomber command —based dreadful odds when embarking on a mission. 44% of aircrew lost their lives during world war two and on the lancaster there was one place which was by far there was one place which was by far the most dangerous place to be. here, where the rear gunner, or tail and surely as he was known, did his best. —— tail end trolley. and surely as he was known, did his best. -- tail end trolley. it was the place shot at first in any action and life expectancy was about 40 hours. only two other lancaster is as still airworthy. they are
6:56 am
continuing to try to make this on the third. it will be extremely emotional, it will be mission accomplished. isn‘t it fascinating? the confines they were working in and the risks they were working in and the risks they were working in and the risks they were facing. we will follow that project through and see what happens. fascinating to see what happens inside. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m sonja jessup. an air quality alert‘s been issued in london for today, by the city‘s mayor. air pollution is expected to be poor across areas of the capital. in the first five days of 2017, london breached its legal limits for toxic air for the entire year. there are calls for the capital‘s congestion charge to be reformed, so that drivers would pay more at rush hour. the london assembly says traffic jams are costing the economy billions of pounds a year and that drivers who spend
6:57 am
the longest time. the mayor‘s office says there are already moves to tackle the problem, including better coordination of roadworks. british airways cabin crew at heathrow go on strike today in a dispute over pay. the workers, who are members of unite, are walking out for three days. ba says all its long—haul flights will operate as normal. but the airline has had to cancel a small number of short—haul services. a special service will take place this afternoon 100 years on from the silvertown explosion in east london, in which 73 people lost their lives. hundreds more were injured in the blast at a docklands munitions factory. the explosion was so forceful it shattered windows as far away as the savoy hotel. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, we‘ve got quite a few problems this morning. no bakerloo line between harrow and wealdstone and queen‘s park. minor delays on the
6:58 am
0verg round between euston and watford junction. the piccadilly line has severe delays between acton town to uxbridge. there are also no heathrow connect trains this morning because of signalling problems. this is how it looks at the blackwall tunnel. northbound traffic on the southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. and there‘s been an accident on the m25 — we‘ve got delays clockwise afterjunction 8 for reigate back throuthunction 7 for the m23. let‘s have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. today‘s weather is looking similar to yesterday. still feeling cold, but with lots of sparkling sunshine. we start the day again at about the freezing mark in central london, but in rural spots down to minus four, minus five. don‘t forget to wear layers this morning and save a bit of time for your car windscreen. lots of sunshine around today. winds are very light
6:59 am
and temperatures struggle only between five and seven degrees celsius by the time we get to the end of the afternoon. 0vernight, no big changes. we start to get the blue tinge on the map again, indicating sub zero temperatures. perhaps a few early mist patches around. for the most part a nice, bright, sunny start. high pressure dominating, notjust on friday but for the course of the weekend, so we should stay dry. there could be a little more cloud tomorrow edging into northern home counties, but again plenty of sunshine, especially for the south. and another freezing start on saturday. more in the way of cloud. but on sunday the brightness should emerge again and no rain in the forecast either for the start of next week. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. thousands more tourists are still waiting to be flown home as a deadline for a political agreement passes. good morning, it‘s thursday 19th january
7:00 am
also this morning: theresa may heads to switzerland to explain her brexit plan to world business leaders. we have heard from big business about what leaving the single market could mean for them. but how about small firms? i am could mean for them. but how about small firms? iam here could mean for them. but how about small firms? i am here in manchester finding out what it means for import—export firms. a warning that the world‘s primates are facing an extinction crisis, as their habitats are destroyed by human behaviour. in sport, johanna konta is through to the third round at the australian open and liverpool are through to the fourth round of the fa cup. lucas leiva‘s first goal in seven years helped them beat plymouth. novak djokovic is on court and he is having a real battle against the unseeded denis istomin. good morning from tukalo high school in mississippi. these students are off
7:01 am
to washington to perform for donald trump at his inauguration. get practising. we‘ve more from jon in tupelo, the birth place of elvis presley, in about 20 minutes. and carol has the weather. good morning. the weather is stuck ina good morning. the weather is stuck in a rut. what you had yesterday is almost what you will have today. sunshine in the south after a cold and frosty start. today are a few more of us will see some breaks and i will tell you where you can expect those in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. hundreds of british holidaymakers have landed back in the uk from the gambia amid concerns of a worsening political crisis. the foreign office is continuing to advise people to avoid all but essential travel to the country, after its outgoing president refused to meet a midnight deadline to hand over power. thousands more tourists are due to be brought home in the coming days. greg dawson reports. back home sooner than they thought but relieved to be safe.
7:02 am
these passengers landed at manchester in the early hours and thousands more will fly home today after their holidays ended with the threat of a violent conflict. it was very scary and the local people were crying and worried about their children. my family is still there. my daughter with her baby, my first daughter. they are not the only ones who have left. over 25,000 citizens have fled to neighbouring senegal as the threat of a military invasion looms. my total rejection of election results. this crisis centres on one man refusing to buckle to pressure from a regional alliance now surrounding his tiny nation. yahya jammeh initially conceded defeat in last month‘s election after 22 years in power but he changed his mind, claiming the vote had been fraudulent. the man who defeated him, adama barrow, fled to senegal but remains confident he will sworn in later today. troops from senegal and ghana
7:03 am
are now gathered along the border and nigeria has sent fighterjets and a warship to the area. they have asked for un permission to intervene, after their deadline for the president to step down expired. while gambians hope for a peaceful solution, thousands of tourists have an anxious wait to leave the country. theresa may will outline her brexit strategy to business and political leaders at the world economic forum in the swiss resort of davos today. the prime minister will seek to convince her audience, many of whom opposed britain leaving the eu, that it is possible to make a political and economic success of brexit. our business correspondent, tanya beckett is in davos for us this morning. we know it is cold there and the prime minister will probably have a tough audience today. yes. i think she will want to communicate to the
7:04 am
business leaders who because after all this is a forum for pitching business, they need to know that britain is open for business. it may leave all of the unions but it wants to do deals. that is the top of her message. of course, as you rightly say, other participants, politicians here may well see her as part of a disintegration of europe because the problem is that it lies notjust within the united kingdom but was in france, germany and for that matter italy. so they are going to be concerned about any adding of momentum to the dissent within the european union about what it stands for. and there is a wider context, of course. we know the donald trump is about to be inaugurated as president and he has spoken about ripping up trade agreements. if you look at that background, the message of theresa may is tempered. all she
7:05 am
is saying is that she wants to leave the european union because that is what people voted for. there are those who are saying that there are two sides to this negotiation and they have laid out where it wants to start from. you will need to deal with us, however, about what you can expect from the european union going forward. 0ne expect from the european union going forward. one of those people was the finance ministerforfriends forward. one of those people was the finance minister for friends but forward. one of those people was the finance ministerforfriends but he is now european commissioner for economic and financial affairs for the eu. it must be clear that we cannot have all of the advantages of being a memberof cannot have all of the advantages of being a member of a club when you are out of the club. i think our british friends, who invented clubs, they can understand that. if you wire it, you are in. if you are out you are out. it is not free access, it is not free lunch. so it is going to bea it is not free lunch. so it is going to be a difficult road ahead and the head of the imf has outlined this,
7:06 am
what we are talking about is really setting up a trade deal with the european union between two parties. i was speaking to the trade minister for international trade for canada yesterday and he was saying, look, we have done this with the eu and it can be done. the uk is not the back of the queue by any means, in fact it is top of the list. so there is a willingness now that britain has stated its position, or other countries to come forward and say let us cut a deal. it may not be quick. thank you very much. scientists say they‘re working to deal with three diseases they fear could become global health emergencies. a group of charities and governments is spending more than £370 million to tackle middle east respiratory syndrome, and the lassa and nipah viruses. and after seven we‘ll be speaking to a professor final preparations are under way in
7:07 am
washington for the inauguration of the donald trump. yesterday, mr trump tweeted a photo of himself writing his inaugural address, saying he was "looking forward to friday." meanwhile, departing president barack 0bama gave his last press conference as head of state, and offered his successor advice on the presidency. ican i can tell you that... and this is something i have told him, that this isa something i have told him, that this is a job of such magnitude that you can not do it by yourself. you are enormously reliant on a team. the former us president, george bush senior, has been moved to intensive care in the hospital in texas where he has been receiving treatment for pneumonia since saturday. mr bush, who is 92, is said to be stable after undergoing a procedure to ease his breathing. his wife, barbara, who is 91, has been admitted to the same hospital in dallas as a precaution, suffering from fatigue and a cough. the government‘s being urged to make sure all victims of crime in england and wales can make statements about how it‘s affected them.
7:08 am
the ministry ofjustice says it will announce plans "in due course" to strengthen victims‘ rights. the victims commissioner says only a small number of people are currently being given the opportunity. we need now to have victims rights in an establishment that gives them the quality, respect and actually the protection that they should quite rightly have because they have lost a loved one. this review shows that enough is enough and i am looking for government to ensure that the victims have the rights they truly deserve to give them respect and dignity and also the protection that they should have to ensure that they feel that their voice is being listened to. the world‘s primates face an "extinction crisis" with 60% of species now threatened with extinction, according to research published in the journal ‘science advances‘. an international study, led by british scientists, has found if urgent action isn‘t ta ken, our closest biological relatives face an extinction crisis.
7:09 am
0ur closest biological relatives. but while the human population continues to grow, most of our fellow primates are now sliding towards extinction. this international team of scientists trawled through the data on more than 500 primate species, revealing a looming extinction crisis. they estimate that 60% of primate species are now threatened with extinction, and 75% have populations that are in decline. these guys are ring—tailed lemurs, and they are just one of the primate species that‘s been assessed in this new global study. as nice as it is to see them thriving here in captivity, their natural habitat is disappearing fast. and it‘s human activity that‘s driving that. forest habitat that these animals rely on is being destroyed, primarily for agriculture and logging. these forests provides essential services for people. they help in mitigating
7:10 am
climate change by being carbon stocks. they help in providing clear water for people, pollinations so people can grow their crops. reversing these declines means looking closely at where we source products like timber, palm oil and meat, making sure destruction of tropical forests is not part of their production process. an air quality alert‘s been issued in london for today, by the city‘s mayor. air pollution is expected to be poor across areas of the capital. people who have heart or lung problems, or the elderly, are being advised to reduce strenuous activity particularly outdoors. in the first five days of 2017, london breached its legal limits for toxic air for the entire year. a dramatic eruption of mexico‘s colima volcano has been captured on video. the explosion was accompanied by a large plume of ash and smoke that rose 2,000 metres
7:11 am
above the crater. the volcano is one of the country‘s most active, and has increased its activity since last october. mexico has more than 3,000 volcanoes, but only four are considered active. amazing to get those pictures. it is 12 minutes past seven. more than £370 million is being put into scientific research to prevent another devastating global epidemic, such as ebola or zika. the money has been promised by governments and private foundations to target three diseases — lassa, mers and nipah. the idea is for scientists to come up the idea is for scientists to come up with a vaccine so they are available when an outbreak begins. we‘re joined now by professor of global infectious diseases. thank
7:12 am
you for your time. some of these will be news to people today as you talk about them. can you take is through the three we are talking about? mers first. these are infections that have come to light in the last few years of following on from a whole series of historical discoveries. mers is a corona virus, a virus, across the globe but particular strains of the corona can cause severe pneumonia. the first corona virus became to notoriety was a few years ago with size, a corona virus in southeast asia and china. mers has emerged in the middle east and it is another corona virus that can cause pneumonia. these viruses can cause pneumonia. these viruses can spread person to person. the worry is that an outbreak of mers could spread globally across the
7:13 am
planet in the same way as pandemic influenza did causing major mortality and disturbance to human populations. where have they come from? many of these viruses come from? many of these viruses come from contact with animals. they do not have a natural reservoir in humans but was in with humans. but because of changes we have made and because of changes we have made and because we are moving into different parts of the ecosystem, we come in contact with these viruses which then spread into the human population we see these epidemics. nipah, not one i have heard of before. that came to notoriety in malaysia in the 1990s. it was associated with pig farming, clearing of the jungle to do pig farming and lead to contact with fruit bats. those fruit bats bred the virus to the pigs to the humans. apart from malaysia we now get regular how breaks in places like india and bangladesh. again, not
7:14 am
highly infectious but a virus that could mutate and become more efficient at spreading between humans and then we have a situation ofa humans and then we have a situation of a global pandemic. can you explain why these three have been chosen? does not mean that they definitely will cause an epidemic, it is the fact that you want to look into it to stop something. why these three? this announcement of this money is an attempt to get ahead of it, to get ahead of the curve so we are not in the same position that we we re are not in the same position that we were weeds ebola where we did not have an effective vaccine. 0ne were weeds ebola where we did not have an effective vaccine. one was developed quickly but before it was brought to use in humans, thousands of people had died. the process is to say ok, what infections out there are likely to be the next potential big epidemic? not saying they will be, but the potential. there has been an exercise done to look at a
7:15 am
whole series of infections. these three in particular are the starting point of this initiative. they are the ones that have come out where we feel they are close to developing a vaccine and with the right injection of funds and the right injection of science we should be able to move these forward to having a vaccine. this is the starting point. there will be more vaccine for other diseases. inevitably, when we sit here in use words like global epidemics and people think about the scare we have had before. people worry, don‘t they come something that might happen. what are the real risks for people listening to you explaining what these things? well... if i come back to a bowler, a bowler is probably a good example. ebola had been, we had known about it the last 50 years. it was a disease that occurred in ramon parts of africa in underprivileged populations which tended to come and go very quickly and a few hundred people would be killed but everybody ignored that and we did not think it
7:16 am
was important. and then the wake—up call was 2015 with the ebola crisis in west africa. the possibility of spreading through air travel around the globe. it is difficult to see which one will be a problem. at a high window from the experience with ebola that the problem is there and it could come to us. if we have a vaccine, we have an efficient tool to control them. we can be prepared for these epidemics and that is where the thinking is. why not be prepared when we have a thread like this? thank you for your time. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: british tourists have returned from the gambia, as concerns grow about the political situation there. the foreign office is urging people to avoid non—essential travel to the country. theresa may is to outline her brexit plans to business leaders at the world economic forum in the swiss resort of davos. here‘s carol with a look
7:17 am
at this morning‘s weather. iam i am pleased to say it‘s a bit calmer and that the beautiful picture behind you. thanks. good morning. this is glen cove. we have high pressure a cross as and what you‘ve had your hanging onto, with a couple of exceptions. it won‘t change until the early part of next week when it becomes more u nsettled of next week when it becomes more unsettled from the west. cloudy this morning, some of us being missed, and we have a fairly weak weather front in norfolk, the midlands, into wales. that is producing spits and spots of light rain and drizzle. as we come into south england from the south—west, through the isle of wight, towards kent, most of east anglia as well and the south midlands, this is where it‘s a cold start. there is frost around. north
7:18 am
of that you come across the weather front producing spots of drizzle. but a lot of cloud pushing into scotland. some eastern areas missing it altogether and here it‘s a cold start, with some shower was moving into the north—west. for northern ireland this morning cloudy again. it is mild for the time of year. across most of wales it is cloudy. through the course of the day we hang on to the sunshine across southern areas. more cloud coming in from the north sea, so it would be gentler. breaks developing in west wales and in the shelter of the hills. the same in northern ireland. the shelter of the hills, the shelter of the pennines and grampians, we are likely to see sunshine. temperatures coming down from the north. today you will
7:19 am
notice a bit of a difference and certainly over the next few days as well. into this evening and overnight under clear skies again it will be called, temperatures dropping quickly. —— will be cold. again shallow mist and fog patches. the same for north—east scotland, where we hang on to clearer skies. for the rest of the uk it won‘t be frosty. so we start off tomorrow with again the sunshine where we lose the fog. but we have more of that spread northwards into wales. more of the midlands see sunshine tomorrow as well. northern ireland should see sunshine and north—west scotland. for the rest of scotland and quitea scotland. for the rest of scotland and quite a large chunk of england we hang on to the cloud. again thick enough for some rain and drizzle. temperatures coming down, a city where they should be. as we head into the weekend more of the same. a
7:20 am
lot of cloud around and it isn‘t until we get to the middle of next week, tuesday and wednesday, that we start to see a breakdown in the weather from the west. with just one day left until donald trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the united states, preparations are in full swing, but can he deliver the jobs and trade that he promised? this week we‘ve been taking a road trip through the heart of america on route 45. today, breakfast‘sjon kay is in tupelo, mississippi, the birthplace of elvis presley, to hear their hopes for the next four years. one last practice before heading to washington. tonight, the tupelo high school band will be travelling 900 miles from mississippi to the capital to play at president trump‘s inauguration. your face is going to ache.
7:21 am
you think so? what are you most excited about? just to march in the parade and go to washington for the first time. what do you think of your new president? um... donald trump got 60% of the votes in this state. the students might be playing for him, but that doesn‘t mean they are all fans of the new man in the white house. if you had been able to vote, put your hands up if you would have voted for donald trump. not exactly overwhelming. three. i think some of his ideas are pretty great and i think he can make america great again, wejust have to believe in him and see what happens. you didn‘t put your hand up. no. why not? i don't like him. but you‘re about to go and play for him. i know, but i'm forced to.
7:22 am
i like washington, but i don't like him. you‘re going for the trip? yeah, basically. lots of celebrities said no to performing at the inauguration. why did you say yes? i‘m not a fan of trump, but i‘m going for the experience and for my band. i‘m not going for him, i‘m going for me. music matters in this small southern town. in fact, it put tupelo on the map. just off route 45 is the tiny house where elvis presley was born. but we‘re not here to talk about the king, we‘re here to talk about the new president. because as well as producing rock ‘n‘ roll stars, tupelo produces cars. look at this. 1957 chevrolet. i wish we had hired one of these for our road trip. donald trump has promised a return to the heyday of american manufacturing. he says he will create jobs and improve trade deals. this local steel company supplies the car industry.
7:23 am
they believe the new president will cut red tape, cut taxes and boost growth. i feel very optimistic... the boss here hopes donald trump will fill his government with tough business people. and if they don‘t do it he will fire them! but it isn‘t the apprentice. politics is more complicated and more nuanced. will he be able to cope with the political diplomatic challenges? that remains to be seen. i think he is introducing something into the political landscape that has never been done before. politics all shook up. elvis stood right here on the cross and asked for his first guitar. this hardware store is where the young presley‘s music career began. as well as guitars they sell tools to local businesses and they are waiting to see what trump really means for jobs and manufacturing. we know what he will do.
7:24 am
this is a man who has not got a political record. he has gone on record sometimes supporting things, but not as a sitting officeholder. does it worry you that he hasn‘t given much detail about what he will do? he has made big promises but not explained how. it does worry us and i think it worries everybody, what the future holds. anything you take to the parade is subject to being searched. the students are ready to go. tomorrow they will perform outside the white house. and this nation will have to march to a very different beat. looking forward to tomorrow, the final part ofjon‘s journey. he will report from washington county in alabama, where he‘ll be speaking to people who feel left out of politics. if you‘re missing planet earth two, there‘s a brand new series of spy in the wild on bbc one.
7:25 am
we have one of the spies here. as you can see, he is an electronic. —— an animatronic. he is placed in the wild with real orangutans and he mimics them. they get this fantastic footage because inside his eye, one of them has a camera so he can see and record what‘s happening. it gives a unique insight into wildlife. you can see the movements. and the way it is mimicking the actions of the orangutan with its mouth. clever. we will here for —— hear more from the producers later. still to come this morning: how are smaller british businesses planning for the changes that are starting to emerge?
7:26 am
ben is out in manchester for us this morning. good morning. good morning. welcome to manchester. we are here because we are talking about the impact on small firms because it is often the case that big is this make their voice heard when it comes to things like changes in policy and of course we heard a lot from theresa may this week about leaving the customs union, leaving the single market, what would that mean for businesses, began small. the guys here import of rugs from europe and also from races like india. and of course the fall in the value of the pound has made them more expensive, so they are trying not to pass that on to customers. at the same time they are concerned about what leaving the single market could mean. could it mean more tariffs and fees? we‘ve also been speaking to businesses that say this could be a great opportunity and could encourage more businesses to look outside of europe for new trade opportunities. so we will hear from both sides of that
7:27 am
debate this morning. before we do that, let‘s get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m sonja jessup. there are calls for the capital‘s congestion charge to be scrapped and replaced with a system where the amount drivers pay depends on when, where and how much they drive. the london assembly says traffic jams are costing the economy billions of pounds a year. the mayor‘s office says there are already moves to tackle the problem, including better coordination of roadworks. british airways cabin crew at heathrow go on strike today in a dispute over pay. members of the unite union are walking out for three days. ba says all its long—haul flights will operate as normal, but it‘s had to cancel a small number of short—haul services. the london sprinterjames ellington says he doesn‘t know how he, or his team—mate nigel levine, survived a motorbike accident in spain. the gb athlete has had surgery on a broken leg and both men have a suspected broken pelvis.
7:28 am
there are fears they might not be able to compete at the highest level again. a special service will take place this afternoon 100 years on from the silvertown explosion in east london, in which 73 people lost their lives. hundreds more were injured in the blast at a docklands munitions factory. the explosion was so forceful it shattered windows as far away as the savoy hotel. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. we‘ve got quite a few problems on the tube. the bakerloo line has severe delays between harrow & wealdstone and queen‘s park. thejubilee line has minor delays. the 0vergorund has minor delays between euston and watford junction. the piccadilly line has minor delays between acton town to uxbridge. there are also signalling problems affecting heathrow connect trains. they‘re not running at all and it‘s causing 15 minute delays on great western railway between paddington and slough. this is how it looks at the blackwall tunnel. northbound traffic on the southern approach is hardly moving. and on the m25 we‘ve got
7:29 am
clockwise delays for 12 miles from the clacket lane services tojunction 8 for reigate. let‘s have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. today‘s weather is looking similar to yesterday. still feeling cold, but with lots of sparkling sunshine. we start the day again at about the freezing mark in central london, but in rural spots down to minus four, minus five. don‘t forget to layer up this morning and save a bit of time for your car windscreen. plenty of sunshine around again today. winds are very light and temperatures struggle only between five and seven degrees celsius by the time we get to the end of the afternoon. 0vernight, no big changes. we start to get the blue tinge on the map again, indicating sub zero temperatures. perhaps a few early mist patches around. but for the most part a nice, bright, sunny start. high pressure dominating the weather, notjust on friday but for the course of the weekend, so we should stay dry.
7:30 am
there could be a little more cloud tomorrow edging into northern home counties, but again plenty of sunshine, especially for the south. and another freezing start on saturday. more in the way of cloud. but on sunday the brightness should emerge again and no rain in the forecast either for the start of next week. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. the time now is 7:30. hundreds of british holidaymakers have landed back in the uk from the gambia as the political crisis there escalates. president yahya jammeh has ignored a midnight deadline to give way to the winner of last month‘s elections. west african military forces are preparing to move in to enforce a transfer of power. the foreign office continues to advise people to avoid all but essential travel to the country. theresa may will outline her brexit plan to business and political leaders at the world economic forum in davos today. the prime minister will seek to convince her audience, many of whom opposed britain leaving the eu, that it is possible to make a political and economic success of brexit. it comes just days after mrs may confirmed her plan does include britain leaving the
7:31 am
european single market. scientists say they‘re working to deal with three diseases they fear could become global health emergencies. a group of charities and governments is spending more than £370 million to tackle middle east respiratory syndrome, and the lassa and nipah viruses. we have been lucky but the world has major gaps are infections that could cause ebola like events but spread around the world quickly. that puts us in around the world quickly. that puts usina around the world quickly. that puts us in a vulnerable place. final preparations are under way in washington for donald trump to be sworn in as the 45th us president tomorrow. mr trump has tweeted a photo of himself writing his inaugural address, saying he was "looking forward to friday." meanwhile, departing president barack 0bama gave his last press conference as head of state, and offered his successor advice on the presidency. i can tell you that... and this is something i have told him, that this is a job of such magnitude that you can not do it by yourself. you are enormously reliant on a team. the former us president,
7:32 am
george bush senior, has been moved to intensive care in the hospital in texas where he has been receiving treatment for pneumonia since saturday. mr bush, who is 92, is said to be stable after undergoing a procedure to ease his breathing. his wife, barbara, who is 91, has been admitted to the same hospital in dallas as a precaution, suffering from fatigue and a cough. the government‘s being urged to make sure all victims of crime in england and wales can make statements about how it‘s affected them. the ministry ofjustice says it will announce plans "in due course" to strengthen victims‘ rights. the victims commissioner says only a small number of people are currently being given the opportunity. we need now to have victims rights in an establishment that gives them the quality, respect and actually the protection that they should
7:33 am
and dignity and also the protection that they should have to ensure that they feel that their voice is being listened to. sir paul mccartney has begun legal action against sony to regain rights to songs the, died, next; f ff"; died, next; g will died, next; qwill markm" if", when he died. next year witt mankifi—, when he died. next year witt mackifi—, e% the when he died. next year witt mackifi—, ‘first e the released ., when he died. next year witt mackifi—, ‘first single. released ., the weather was ina right in a right now sally carol iner mement. right—newsally here and the way this works is is here and the way this works is that they are playing right now in the australian open. right now in the australian open. right now in the heat in melbourne. a great picture here rob johanna the heat in melbourne. a great picture here robjohanna konta. but i will keep your updated throughout
7:34 am
this bulletin. know that djokovic on right now against denis istomin and he is having a nightmare. so who is playing? he is playing denis -— - § a i"; i: fourth 25:5 g j. ee’ze a i a. f read may know about novak he about novak; he has more about novak djokovic. he has had a difficult time of late and it is interesting to watch somebody so brilliant falling apart on court because that is what it looks like he is doing. he looked once is number one ranking bank but it doesn‘t look like he will get it any time soon. britain‘sjohanna konta eased through to the third round of the australian open.
7:35 am
7:36 am
7:37 am
7:38 am
7:39 am
7:40 am
7:41 am
7:42 am
7:43 am
7:44 am
7:45 am
7:46 am
7:47 am
7:48 am
7:49 am
7:50 am
7:51 am
7:52 am
7:53 am
7:54 am
7:55 am
7:56 am
7:57 am
7:58 am
7:59 am
8:00 am
8:01 am
8:02 am
8:03 am
8:04 am
8:05 am
8:06 am
8:07 am
8:08 am
8:09 am
8:10 am
8:11 am
8:12 am
8:13 am
8:14 am
8:15 am
8:16 am
8:17 am
8:18 am
8:19 am
8:20 am
8:21 am
8:22 am
8:23 am
8:24 am
8:25 am
8:26 am
8:27 am
8:28 am
8:29 am
8:30 am
8:31 am
8:32 am
8:33 am
8:34 am
8:35 am
8:36 am
8:37 am
8:38 am
8:39 am
8:40 am

70 Views

1 Favorite

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on